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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/04/22 in all areas

  1. Hello, @Cian Joyce! All of the network topologies have their pros and cons. First of all, you have to set your company's priorities and define what your resources are. Based on that, you can move forward and check different types of networks that can be used. In our blog, we have multiple articles that can be helpful for you. This one explains the concept of network topology, the difference between physical and logical topologies, the peculiarities and use cases of the following types of topologies: point-to-point, bus, ring, star, tree and hybrid. Additionally, you will find some information on the types of cables you can use in every single case. https://www.nakivo.com/blog/msp-network-topology-for-beginners/ This blog post is a perfect further-read as it is centered on more advanced and complex networks, such as traditional 3-tier hierarchical, clos and multi-tier clos. In addition, you get explained the essential aspects that affect the layout of your network, like the top of rack vs. end of row network connection schemes and layer 2 vs. layer 3 connection. https://www.nakivo.com/blog/msp-network-topology-for-beginners/ Let me know if you require any extra information.
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  2. Hi, @Tayler Odling! The biggest difference between FTP and SFTP is encryption (SSH file transfer protocol) included in SFTP. When you send data with FTP, it isn't encrypted. Note: You can use a secure connection, but your file and the transmission, in general, won't be encrypted. On the contrary, SFTP doesn't transfer data in clear text as it is encrypted. If you decide to stay with FTP, try using passwords and additional security options, like requesting passwords to access the transferred data. If you choose to set up SFTP, use this step-by-step guide https://www.nakivo.com/blog/how-to-build-powershell-tools-to-setup-sftp/ Let me know if you have any additional questions.
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  3. @Cian Joyce, hey! We primarily take into account the optimal performance of your network, ease of maintenance, scalability options and, of course, the network building costs. I guess the best strategy is to define your priorities and then check what types of networks fit the best.
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  4. @heyho, I think it depends on the situation. Some of the controllers might not be supported by your OS, hardware version or device type. Plus, you will need additional controllers for the disk drives. So really, sometimes it is a necessity more than anything.
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  5. @Tayler Odling, Depends on what you need it for. But generally speaking, it's like playing with fire as you get no encryption. It isn't that hard to switch. Try to consider it.
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  6. @fio_fan, Hello! The answer to your question depends on your needs. What you have to know about VXLAN: Adopted for environments with a high number of virtual machines connected to a network. Works on top of the L3 network. Allows you to build a virtual L2 network over an L3 physical network with an encapsulation technique called MAC-in-UDP. Has numerous advantages compared to traditional VLAN. However, VXLAN is much more complicated. As for the main advantages, consider the following: VXLAN pros: Highly scalable networks. Multiple L2 domains can be stretched between various data centers. Supports multi-tenancy, multicast and network segmentation. Flexibility. There is no need for STP. L3 networks work as the underlying network. You avoid overload of physical networks on the L2. You get centralized network management. As for the VXLAN downsides: Initial configuration and deployment are complex. Scaling a centralized controller to manage overlay networks is difficult. You get the headers overhead because of encapsulation techniques. The underlay network requires support for multicast broadcast, unknown unicast and multicast (BUM) traffic. If you want to learn more on the subject, go to our blog post https://www.nakivo.com/blog/vxlan-vmware-basics/ Let me know if you have any additional questions.
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  7. @darkhorse, Hi! Everything depends on your needs. But to make it easy and choose between one of the Microsoft 365 suites and a standalone email solution, answer the following questions: What is the size of your business? (if you have a small business with a simple structure, Exchange Online might satisfy your needs.) How collaborative is your working environment? (If your type of company requires a lot of communication and interactions between the team member, definitely consider one of the Microsoft 365 plans.) What is the nature of your business? (If you require data management tools or storage solutions, for instance, Microsoft 365 might be just a perfect fit to help your business in more ways than just offering email hosting.) What is your budget? (If you want to keep the cost as low as possible, then Exchange Online alone is cheaper. However, the difference between the most affordable plans is one dollar per user per month.) If you want to dive deeper into the topic, check this blog post https://www.nakivo.com/blog/exchange-online-vs-microsoft-office-365-for-business-email-hosting/
    1 point
  8. @Yosmar, Hi! To fix the VM consolidation needed status, do the following: Go to VMware vSphere Client. Click the VM name > Snapshots > Consolidate. You will see a confirmation message: "This operation consolidates all redundant redo logs on your virtual machine. Are you sure you want to continue?" Click Yes to consolidate VM disk files. Note: If you are worried that you can lose your data during disk consolidation, back up your VMware VM. Wait until the task is completed. You can see the progress at the bottom of your VMware vSphere Client. If the VM is running, VM performance can degrade during this operation. The needed time depends on the virtual machine size, the number of snapshots and your VM load. After the VMware disk consolidation is finished, the error message will disappear. However, it might happen that you'll get another error message. Check the guide on how to solve the potential errors in this blog post https://www.nakivo.com/blog/fix-vmware-error-virtual-machine-disks-consolidation-needed/ Let me know if you need any further help.
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  9. @darkhorse Hi! We always used Microsoft 365 plans because they have a lot of functionality. Even the cheapest options offer so many different services and apps, while the pricing is much lower than getting it separately. If you are on the budget, check the most affordable plan that includes Exchange Online.
    1 point
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