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Using Nakivo to migrate a VM to Proxmox


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I thought I would share my steps for using Nakivo to migrate a Hyper-V or Nutanix servers to Proxmox.

Steps to get a Nutanix or Hyper-V VM into Proxmox using Nakivo

Most of the time it will be easier to use a Hyper-V or Nutanix backup and then do an "Export Backup" to get the .vhd files.
Then import those into Proxmox. 

image.png.259cdd101500a60aa7623ff87d0dd91e.png

 

Do not export as VHDX, use VHD.

image.png.990e37dd52df5f9e07de59357b0cf20c.png

Use SFTP to upload the VHD to Proxmox.  I upload them under /mnt/pve with WinSCP, but if your using Ceph and your local storage is limited, you may need to upload it to /mnt/pve/cephfs or mount other NFS storage for staging like I did with my NFS share called qnap-proxmox.

In these examples, I will create a VM called 102 and make it without a virtual disk (Use this command line or use the GUI, I like the GUI)

qm create 102 --name MyServerName --memory 4048 --sockets 2 --cores 2 --net0 virtio,bridge=vmbr2

Your Bridge may not be vmbr2 like mine, so double check that before you copy and paste the command line from here.

image.png.d3f3b487e5208f8ebccd406ee991547e.png

  • Import the VHD disk to the VM without specifying a format (VM 102 in this example) - pvpool1 is my ceph storage pool
qm disk import 102 /mnt/pve/qnap-proxmox/vm-102-disk-1.vhd pvpool1

Check your storage name and don't just copy and paste mine (pvpool1) unless your ceph config is like mine.  Your storage might be called local-zfs or just local

Attach the disk and configure the boot order from the GUI, also set the boot mode to UEFI if it was UEFI before the move.

image.thumb.png.22604c38463cb74bc51cfb577090fa11.png

image.png.1f17d0276e109ee2667588a590dd05df.png

image.png.961815709f9d12988c090737279bd61e.png

Start the new VM, it may need to reboot 2 or 3 times to install all the drivers.

Mount the virtio ISO to the CD Drive if this is a new Windows VM. 
You should really install the virtio drivers before the migration for windows servers.

image.png.d095b5729cf6068376264557ce6cf23a.png

Login and install the Guest tools from the virtio ISO.  D:\guest-agent\qemu-ga-x86_64.msi

image.png.8c5389192335c82848cada8cb19f5241.png

 

Notes:

  • Nutanix servers will usually already have VirtIO drivers for Windows installed.  New Windows Servers or Window Servers on Hyper-V will need Virtio drivers installed before migration.   Linux already has virtio drivers installed by default.
  • I give all servers at least 2 CPU and 2 cores to start with and adjust later.
  • Check the box for Qemu agent and TPM (if UEFI) when you create the server VM.
  • If you're restoring a Windows VM, be sure to change the OS Type from the default Linux to Windows, I missed that in my demo.
  • image.png.2442b1c549b6718d7205321370cf9a54.png

No network after first boot up?  Change the NIC from VirtIO to Intel E1000, then try installing VirtIO now that you have network again over Intel E1000.

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On 5/31/2024 at 10:28 PM, Mr.Ed said:

I thought I would share my steps for using Nakivo to migrate a Hyper-V or Nutanix servers to Proxmox.

Steps to get a Nutanix or Hyper-V VM into Proxmox using Nakivo

Most of the time it will be easier to use a Hyper-V or Nutanix backup and then do an "Export Backup" to get the .vhd files.
Then import those into Proxmox. 

image.png.259cdd101500a60aa7623ff87d0dd91e.png

 

Do not export as VHDX, use VHD.

image.png.990e37dd52df5f9e07de59357b0cf20c.png

Use SFTP to upload the VHD to Proxmox.  I upload them under /mnt/pve with WinSCP, but if your using Ceph and your local storage is limited, you may need to upload it to /mnt/pve/cephfs or mount other NFS storage for staging like I did with my NFS share called qnap-proxmox.

In these examples, I will create a VM called 102 and make it without a virtual disk (Use this command line or use the GUI, I like the GUI)

qm create 102 --name MyServerName --memory 4048 --sockets 2 --cores 2 --net0 virtio,bridge=vmbr2

Your Bridge may not be vmbr2 like mine, so double check that before you copy and paste the command line from here.

image.png.d3f3b487e5208f8ebccd406ee991547e.png

  • Import the VHD disk to the VM without specifying a format (VM 102 in this example) - pvpool1 is my ceph storage pool
qm disk import 102 /mnt/pve/qnap-proxmox/vm-102-disk-1.vhd pvpool1

Check your storage name and don't just copy and paste mine (pvpool1) unless your ceph config is like mine.  Your storage might be called local-zfs or just local

Attach the disk and configure the boot order from the GUI, also set the boot mode to UEFI if it was UEFI before the move.

image.thumb.png.22604c38463cb74bc51cfb577090fa11.png

image.png.1f17d0276e109ee2667588a590dd05df.png

image.png.961815709f9d12988c090737279bd61e.png

Start the new VM, it may need to reboot 2 or 3 times to install all the drivers.

Mount the virtio ISO to the CD Drive if this is a new Windows VM. 
You should really install the virtio drivers before the migration for windows servers.

image.png.d095b5729cf6068376264557ce6cf23a.png

Login and install the Guest tools from the virtio ISO.  D:\guest-agent\qemu-ga-x86_64.msi

image.png.8c5389192335c82848cada8cb19f5241.png

 

Notes:

  • Nutanix servers will usually already have VirtIO drivers for Windows installed.  New Windows Servers or Window Servers on Hyper-V will need Virtio drivers installed before migration.   Linux already has virtio drivers installed by default.
  • I give all servers at least 2 CPU and 2 cores to start with and adjust later.
  • Check the box for Qemu agent and TPM (if UEFI) when you create the server VM.
  • If you're restoring a Windows VM, be sure to change the OS Type from the default Linux to Windows, I missed that in my demo.
  • image.png.2442b1c549b6718d7205321370cf9a54.png

No network after first boot up?  Change the NIC from VirtIO to Intel E1000, then try installing VirtIO now that you have network again over Intel E1000.

@Mr.Ed Thank you for sharing your guide on using NAKIVO Backup & Replication to migrate a Hyper-V or Nutanix server to Proxmox. Your step-by-step instructions, command line examples, and additional notes provide a solid foundation for users to follow, covering the majority of migration cases.

Keep in mind that there may be certain cases not covered by this workflow due to unique configurations and requirements in each environment. 

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